Oct 2020

Kuriousity

It is claimed that in 1899 the head of the U.S Patent office suggested that they should close their doors because everything that could be invented had been invented. This idea was as absurd as flat Earth theory.

 

Since 1899 we have seen 120 years of unparalleled human progression. In this time frame automobiles have gone from buggies to self-driving cars, air travel has been made possible, TV, phones, electronic medical equipment, and of course the internet have all come about and are so commonplace we almost forget the wonder that they are.

 

So no, everything that can be invented has not been invented and we will never reach a point where that is true. This is because the driving force that has pushed all progression we seen throughout history is still alive in each person today. Curiosity.

 

Some may argue that monetary incentives, notoriety, and other forces push us to invent, discover, and improve. However, at the end of almost every progression is a person tinkering in their garage or up in their bedroom reworking a problem because they are curious.

To understand this, we need to better understand curiosity itself. There are two types of curiosity: cognitive and sensory. Cognitive is about discovering new information or new knowledge while sensory is the need for new sensations or thrills. Both are biological responses in times of uncertainty or when lacking knowledge. Essentially, we are programmed to ask questions and to seek new information.

 

 

Curiosity is an emotion that pushes us to become better. It helps us to learn new things, to better understand our environments, to take risks, to explore, to try something different, and to create. For an individual curiosity makes life more enjoyable and collectively curiosity improves the quality of living for all.

 

Unfortunately, people around us don’t always encourage curiosity. You have likely been urged to be careful when exploring something by being told, “curiosity killed the cat.” Sure, there can be a little risk involved with curiosity but there is always a little risk tied to every good reward.

 

At Kurious & Co, we believe that curiosity saved the cat. The inventions and progress that have happened because of curiosity have improved the world and even save lives. Not to mention it makes your life better when it pushes you to try the new sushi roll at dinner tonight.

As a company, we still think the world is full of plenty of wonders that should be explored. Life is richer and more colorful when we try something new and look for more. We do that and Kurious & Co and we think you should too.

 

Stay Kurious!

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